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3's a Crowd3's a Crowd was a folk rock band from Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, that existed from 1964 to 1969.  The group is particularly notable for its association with Cass Elliott, who co-produced the group's sole album release. The album remains one of Elliott's rare associations as a record producer.

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anvilAnvil are a Canadian heavy metal band from Toronto, Ontario, formed in 1978. The band consists of Steve "Lips" Kudlow (vocals, guitar), Robb Reiner (drums) and Chris Robertson (bass). To date, the band has released fifteen studio albums, and has been cited as having influenced many notable heavy metal groups, including Megadeth, Slayer, Anthrax and Metallica.

The band, in particular Kudlow and Reiner, was the subject of the 2008 documentary film, Anvil! The Story of Anvil, directed by the screenwriter and former Anvil roadie, Sacha Gervasi. Upon its release, the film garnered critical acclaim from many major publications, and has since brought the band renewed recognition, including opening slots
with AC/DC and Saxon. Appearances at both major heavy metal festivals, including Download, Loud Park and Hellfest, and independent music festivals like Bumbershoot and SXSW, also followed the release of the film. Reviewers described Anvil as a pioneering hair metal band that was popular in the 1980s but then faded into obscurity in the 1990s, while refusing to stop playing, recording and gigging. Anvil's antics on and off stage, the setbacks they suffered, and their determination to keep going was compared to the fictional band Spinal Tap.


April WineApril Wine is a Canadian rock band formed in 1969. Originally based in Halifax, Nova Scotia, the band enjoyed international success in the 1970s and 1980s, releasing more than 20 albums since 1971.

The band's name was chosen simply because members thought the two words sounded good together. The original members were brothers David Henman on guitar and Ritchie Henman on drums. Their cousin Jim Henman joined in on bass and Myles Goodwyn completed the sound on lead vocals and guitar. In early 1970 the band relocated to Montreal. Shortly after arriving in their new home the band was signed by Aquarius Records. They recorded and released their debut album April Wine in September 1971. The album spawned their first single, "Fast Train", which received fairly steady airplay on radio stations across Canada and established Myles Goodwyn as the band's main songwriter. The single's success led the band's label to ask for a second album amid the first of many lineup changes: Jim Henman left the band in the fall of 1971 and was replaced by Jim Clench.

Under the guidance of producer Ralph Murphy, April Wine recorded their second album, titled On Record. The first single from the album was a cover version of the song "You Could Have Been a Lady", originally by the band Hot Chocolate. The record was a commercial success, hitting number 5 on the Canadian charts, as well as cracking the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the United States where it stayed for 11 weeks, peaking at No. 32. Immediately following that triumph, April Wine released a second single from On Record, titled "Bad Side of the Moon." This song, written by Elton John and Bernie Taupin, also got much airplay on Canadian radio stations and was a minor hit in the U.S. as well. Both tracks remain staples on classic rock radio stations in Canada. On Record was certified Gold in Canada and the band, along with Murphy, returned to the studio to exploit the popularity generated by their second release.

During the recording of the band's third album, still another line-up change occurred. Before the album's completion, brothers David and Ritchie Henman resigned, leaving Myles Goodwyn as the only remaining original member. Goodwyn and Clench decided to continue the band and began auditions for replacement musicians. Eventually drummer Jerry Mercer (formerly of the Canadian band Mashmakhan) and guitarist Gary Moffet were chosen, and together they finished recording the band's third album entitled Electric Jewels, which contained songs such as "Weeping Widow," "Just Like That" and "Lady Run, Lady Hide." These songs would remain in April Wine's concert set lists for many years. In support of this album, the band embarked on the Electric Adventure Tour which featured a massive lighting and pyrotechnic show.

In mid-1977, April Wine was booked to play a charity concert at the famed El Mocambo Club in Toronto, Ontario. Co-headliner on the bill was a band called "The Cockroaches," who turned out to be The Rolling Stones. The pseudonym was a poorly kept secret and huge crowds turned out for the event. April Wine's performance was captured and released as the album Live at the El Mocambo. The band got its first chance at touring the U.S. following the El Mocambo gig, first opening for The Rolling Stones, then for various popular headliners, including Styx and fellow Canadian band Rush.

Another line-up change occurred in 1977, though rather than someone leaving, the band added a fifth member, Brian Greenway, who was brought in as a third guitarist. Not only could Brian contribute on guitar, he was also an accomplished singer and harmonica player. His addition gave April Wine a powerful three guitar attack that would become synonymous with their hard rock sound. Also, with Brian on board to cover guitar duties, it allowed Myles Goodwyn to switch to keyboards for the band's long list of popular ballads. Incidentally, Brian Greenway's former band, The Dudes, also contained April Wine alumni David and Ritchie Henman.

April Wine continues to tour across Canada annually and also plays festivals in Europe and in the United States, with the group now consisting of Goodwyn, Greenway, Lanthier, and drummer Roy "Nip" Nichol.


Bryan AdamsBryan Guy Adams, born 5 November 1959, is a Canadian singer songwriter and photographer.

At the age of 14, Adams worked as a dish washer to save money for a guitar. He started auditioning as a guitarist while rehearsing his own band in his mother's rented basement in North Vancouver. Adams elected to sing until they found a singer, but they never found one. He quit school after his auditions got him jobs to go on the road and play underage in nightclubs with bar bands like Shock and a short stint with pub band Sweeney Todd, who in 1976 released If Wishes Were Horses with the 15-year-old Adams as the singer. By age 17, Adams had quit touring and started working in the Vancouver studio scene, working as a background vocalist for the CBC and backing local artists and with Motown keyboardist Robbie King, whom Adams attributes as having given him his first ever paying session.

In 1978, at the age of 18, Adams met Jim Vallance introduced by a mutual friend in a Vancouver music store. Vallance was the former drummer and principal songwriter for Vancouver-based rock band Prism and had recently quit that band to focus on a career as a studio musician and songwriter. They agreed to meet at Vallance's home studio a few days later, which proved to be the beginning of a partnership which still exists today.[when?] Later in 1978, Adams signed to A&M records for one dollar. Some of the first demos written in 1978 have surfaced over the years, most notably "I'm Ready" (recorded for both the album Cuts Like a Knife and later his release for MTV Unplugged) and "Remember," which was recorded on his first album. Both songs were covered by other artists even before his first album was released. Also recorded during this time was the disco song "Let Me Take You Dancing," which made the Canadian RPM chart in March 1979 and its B-Side "Don't Turn Me Away". "Straight From The Heart" was also written during this period. The song was later recorded for Adams's third album "Cuts Like A Knife" in 1983 and released as a single, becoming Adams's first top ten record in the U.S. in 1983.


Paul AnkaPaul Albert Anka, born July 30, 1941, is a Canadian-American singer, songwriter, and actor. Anka became famous in the late 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s with hit songs like "Diana", "Lonely Boy", "Put Your Head on My Shoulder", and "(You're) Having My Baby". He wrote such well-known music as the theme for The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson and one of Tom Jones's biggest hits, "She's a Lady", as well as the English lyrics for Frank Sinatra's signature song, "My Way", which has been covered by many including Elvis Presley. He was inducted into Canada's Walk of Fame in 2005.

In 1983, he co-wrote the song "I Never Heard" with Michael Jackson. It was retitled and released in 2009 under the name "This Is It". An additional song that Jackson co-wrote with Anka from this 1983 session, "Love Never Felt So Good", was since discovered and was released on Jackson's posthumous album Xscape in 2014. The song was also released by Johnny Mathis in 1984.


The ACtionFormed in 1977 in Ottawa,Canada,The Action became known as "Ottawa's First Punk band" and lead singer & spokesman for the band Ted Axe was dubbed "The Prince of Punk" by the local press. The band created controversy at their will and soon dominated the Nation's Capitol newspapers. With Axe as their publicity hound, they were even banned from performing at area high schools! They were signed to Montreal's Montreco Records and released their now self-titled EP in 1978 featuring their punk anthem "TVs on the Blink" with legendary producer Tony Roman at the helm.. The quintet opened on US tours for The Ramones and The Stranglers before disbanding in '81. In 2009 the band reformed and signed to DOA's Sudden Death Records. Their new album "The Action-Complete punk Recordings 1977-78" was released.

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brighton-rockBrighton Rock are a Canadian hard rock band who released three albums in their home country during the 1980s and 90s. They broke up in 1991 before reuniting and releasing a live album in 2002.

 

 

 

 


 

brutusBrutus was a Canadian rock band formed in 1969 and active, with interruptions, between 1969 and 1978.

The original band consisted of Walter Zwolinski (then billed as "Wally Soul") as vocalist,  Tom Wilson as bassist, Michael Magann on trumpet, Lance Wright on drums,  Sonny Wingay on guitar, and Bill Robb on sax and trombone. The band was the opening act for popular Canadian and American acts that were touring Canada, such as The Guess Who and for Chicago at the University Of Waterloo. Their 1970 single "Funky Roller Skates" made it to #7 on RPM's list of Canadian Content songs receiving airplay, although the track did not cross over into the top 100.

Brutus disbanded in 1971, then reformed with a revised line-up and new look in 1973. They decided to add a theatrical flair to their stage act, similar to the glam rock bands that were popular in Britain during the same time. With a mixture of heavy makeup, wild costumes, and sexual innuendo,  Brutus became a popular live act, but found few friends with the local authorities or concert organizers. Brutus' live performances reached a pinnacle with a sold out performance at Toronto's Ontario Place.

The new Brutus lineup recorded two singles on GRT Records in 1975,  with "Ooh, Mama Mama" becoming perhaps in retrospect their most remembered  recording -- although it failed to chart, it was named top Canadian single in an end-of-year poll by the Montreal Star. Their debut album would follow in 1976, featuring the group's #65 chart hit "Who Wants To Buy A Song",  but only one further (non-charting) single would follow before they disbanded.

Four notable guitarists associated with Brutus were Gino Scarpelli, later of Goddo, Paul Dean, later of Streetheart and Loverboy, Jerry Doucette, who has had a distinguished solo career, and John Bride, later of the Cameo Blues Band.


Bachman Turner OverdriveBachman–Turner Overdrive is a Canadian rock group from Winnipeg, Manitoba, that had a series of hit albums and singles in the 1970s, selling over 7 million albums in that decade alone. Their 1970s catalogue included five Top 40 albums and six U.S. Top 40 singles (ten in Canada). The band has sold nearly 30 million albums worldwide, and has fans affectionately known as "gearheads" (derived from the band's gear-shaped logo). Many of their songs, including "Let It Ride", "You Ain't Seen Nothing Yet", "Takin' Care of Business", "Hey You" and "Roll On Down the Highway", still receive play on classic-rock stations.


The BandThe Band was a Canadian-American roots rock group that originally consisted of Rick Danko (bass guitar, double bass, fiddle, trombone, vocals), Levon Helm (drums, mandolin, guitar, vocals), Garth Hudson (keyboards, saxophones, trumpet), Richard Manuel (piano, drums, baritone saxophone, vocals) and Robbie Robertson (guitar, vocals). The members of the Band first came together as they joined rockabilly singer Ronnie Hawkins' backing group The Hawks one by one between 1958 and 1963.

In 1964, they separated from Hawkins, after which they toured and released a few singles as Levon and the Hawks and the Canadian Squires. The next year, Bob Dylan hired them for his U.S. tour in 1965 and world tour in 1966. Following the 1966 tour, the group moved with Dylan to Saugerties, New York, where they made the informal 1967 recordings that became The Basement Tapes, which forged the basis for their 1968 debut album Music from Big Pink. Because they were always "the band" to various frontmen, Helm said the name "the Band" worked well when the group came into its own. The group began performing officially as the Band in 1968, and went on to release ten studio albums. Dylan continued to collaborate with the Band over the course of their career, including a joint 1974 tour.

The original configuration of the Band ended its touring career in 1976 with an elaborate live ballroom performance featuring numerous musical celebrities. This performance was immortalized in Martin Scorsese's 1978 documentary The Last Waltz. The Band recommenced touring in 1983 without guitarist Robbie Robertson, who had found success with a solo career and as a Hollywood music producer. Following a 1986 show, Richard Manuel was found dead of suicide, but the remaining three members continued to tour and record albums with a revolving door of musicians filling Manuel's and Robertson's respective roles, before finally settling on Richard Bell, Randy Ciarlante, and Jim Weider. Danko died of heart failure in 1999, after which the group broke up for good. Levon Helm was diagnosed with throat cancer in 1998, and after a series of treatments was able to regain use of his voice. He continued to perform and released several successful albums until he succumbed to the disease in 2012.

The group was inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame in 1989 and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994. In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked them No. 50 on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time, and in 2008, they received the Grammy's Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2004, "The Weight" was ranked the 41st best song of all time in Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time list.

In 2014, The Band was inducted into Canada's Walk of Fame.

 


beau dommageBeau Dommage is a Canadian rock band from Montreal, Quebec, who achieved popular success in Quebec and France in the 1970s.
The group's style included rich vocal harmonies and elements borrowed from folk and country music.

Beau Dommage started in 1972 as an offshoot of the creative association La Quenouille Bleue. Pierre Huet, Robert Léger and Michel Rivard were soon joined by Pierre Bertrand. The next year Réal Desrosiers and Marie Michèle Desrosiers, unrelated despite their identical last name, joined the band.


the beaumarksThe Beau Marks were a Canadian rock music group formed in 1958 in Montreal, Quebec. Their first release, the April 1959 single "Rockin' Blues" b/w "Midnight Party", came out under the name The Del-Tones, but the group changed their name soon afterward in a nod to the Bomarc missile. Their breakthrough hit was "Clap Your Hands," which hit #1 in Canada and Australia, peaked at #45 on the US Billboard pop charts, and #40 on Cashbox. The tune was also released in French as "Frappe Tes Mains". Their debut, ten-track full-length came out in 1960; they appeared on American Bandstand and at a charity concert at Carnegie Hall soon afterwards. Two more albums followed before the group broke up in 1963; a 1968 reunion saw "Clap Your Hands" get a re-release.

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chiliwackChilliwack is a Canadian rock band that had their heyday during the 1970s and 1980s. They are perhaps best remembered for their six biggest songs "My Girl (Gone, Gone, Gone)", "I Believe", "Whatcha Gonna Do", "Fly At Night", "Crazy Talk", and "Lonesome Mary". The band's lineup has changed numerous times, though Bill Henderson has constantly remained a fixture, and Chilliwack continues to tour across Canada.

The band initially formed as the Classics (1964) in Vancouver, British Columbia, but later changed the name to The Collectors (1966). Their psychedelic self-titled debut album yielded the minor hit "Lydia Purple". Their second album was based on the musical score written by the band for a stage play by Canadian playwright George Ryga, Grass and Wild Strawberries.

Chilliwack effectively began with the departure of vocalist Howie Vickers from the Collectors in 1969; however, the band didn't change their name until 1970, to Chilliwack, a Salish term meaning "going back up" and the name of a city east of Vancouver in the Fraser River valley. With lead guitarist Bill Henderson now providing most of the vocals and doing most of the composing, the band released several records that were moderately successful in Canada. Hit singles in Canada included "Lonesome Mary", which entered Cashbox January 22, 1972 "Crazy Talk" and "Fly at Night". The album track "Rain-o", a blues-based composition that appeared in different versions on the Chilliwack debut album and the later Dreams, Dreams, Dreams, was a well-known concert favourite.

Their album 'Riding High' on Goldfish Records (Terry Jacks' Label) contained one of their biggest hits, Crazy Talk which was produced by Terry Jacks.

However, Chilliwack had a difficult time sustaining any success because of their constant label changes. The two Collectors albums were on Warner Brothers, and Chilliwack's first five albums were on four different labels in Canada: Parrot, A&M, Goldfish, and Casino Records. When the band finally found relative stability and success with Vancouver's Mushroom Records, with distribution throughout North America, the label went bankrupt so abruptly in 1979 that Chilliwack's third album for the label, Breakdown in Paradise, was barely released.

In 1978, Brian MacLeod (guitar, drums, keyboards) joined the band for the Lights from the Valley album, and Ab Bryant (bass) joined the band for Breakdown in Paradise, with the other members except for Henderson departing. Chilliwack then signed with Solid Gold Records in Canada and Millennium Records in the U.S. as a trio and enjoyed its greatest success with this new lineup, releasing the albums Wanna Be a Star and Opus X. The singles "My Girl (Gone, Gone, Gone)" (1981), "I Believe" (1982), and "Whatcha Gonna Do (When I'm Gone)" (1982) were popular both in Canada and in the U.S. Rolling Stone Magazine wrote:

"At their best, Chilliwack was the finest Canadian rock band, outrocking BTO and outwriting Burton Cummings. But a lack of consistency kept it from international success."

Henderson and MacLeod received a Best Producer Juno Award in 1982 for Opus X. However, echoing the Mushroom problems, Millennium Records then collapsed. MacLeod and Bryant left the band soon after, and Chilliwack's last new studio recording was released in 1984 with Henderson as the only continuing member. Henderson continued to tour as Chilliwack with other players until December 1988. In 1989 Henderson went on to form the folk-rock supergroup UHF.
Henderson also continued touring with Chilliwack, releasing a new live album in 2003.

2005 saw Chilliwack play Voyageur Days Festival in Mattawa, Ontario, Canada (near North Bay) with other Canadian bands Moxy, Toronto, Trooper, Goddo, Killer Dwarfs and Ray Lyell for the thirtieth anniversary for release of the debut album by Moxy.

Bass player Ab Bryant's son Matt Bryant is the singer/songwriter and founding member of Canadian roots/folk band Headwater.


crowbarCrowbar was a Canadian rock band based in Hamilton, Ontario, best known for their 1971 hit "Oh, What a Feeling".

From 1969 to 1970, most of the members of the group had been a backup band for Ronnie Hawkins under the name "And Many Others". However, in early 1970, he fired them, saying "You guys are so crazy that you could fuck up a crowbar in three seconds!" They recorded their first album in 1970, called Official Music, as King Biscuit Boy and Crowbar. King Biscuit Boy left the band later in 1970, but continued to appear off and on, as a guest performer.

In 1971, the band recorded a performance at Massey Hall, in Toronto, which was released as a double album, Larger than Life (And Live'r than You've Ever Been). The concert, billed as "An Evening of Love With Daffodil Records" was co-produced by concert promoter Martin Onrot and Toronto radio station CHUM-FM. A number of guests appeared with Crowbar at Massey Hall, including members of Lighthouse, Dr. Music, and Everyday People. King Biscuit Boy also returned to perform with his former bandmates. The recording and release of the album is significant as being the first time a Canadian band had recorded and released a "live in concert" album.

Crowbar disbanded in 1975, but was revived in 1977, minus Jozef Chirowski, who had joined Alice Cooper's band. The band performed intermittently during the 1980s.

Recently, Crowbar has played shows around Hamilton, Ontario, including a performance at their induction into the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2011.


Bobby CurtolaRobert Allen "Bobby" Curtola, (born April 17, 1943 in Port Arthur, Ontario) is an early Canadian rock and roll singer and teen idol.

Curtola had several songs on the Canadian music charts beginning with "Hand In Hand With You". Backed by The Martels (named after Curtola's manager, Maria Martell), Curtola went on to record hits such as "Indian Giver", "Hand in Hand with You" and his biggest chart topper, "Fortune Teller" in 1962, which was also successful internationally. Between 1960 and 1968 he had continual single and album releases on the Tartan label in Canada. The managers and main songwriters were brothers Dyer and Basil Hurdon. The Del-Fi label released some of those singles in the US.

In 1966 he won a RPM Gold Leaf Award for becoming the first Canadian to have an album go gold. In the early 1970s, Curtola hosted a CTV musical series entitled, Shake, Rock and Roll and Curtola went on to a successful singing career at Las Vegas, Nevada casino venues and still performs at various clubs today. In the 1980s, in an attempt at updating his image, Curtola briefly adopted the billing Bobby Curtola and released one album under this name before reverting to his original spelling.

In 1998, in recognition of his long service to the Canadian music industry as well as his humanitarian work around the world, he was made a member of the Order of Canada. His pioneering contribution to the genre has been recognized by the Rockabilly Hall of Fame.

Besides his musical work, Curtola is also a business entrepreneur, marketing a successful brand of Caesar cocktail. He is also chief executive officer of Home Farms Technologies, a Canadian-based company which is attempting to develop an environmentally friendly waste management system for hog waste. It is a development stage company and has not found the financing for its first plant yet.

In 2011, Curtola received a star on the Italian Walk of Fame in Toronto, Canada.


Tom CochraneTom Cochrane was born in Lynn Lake, Manitoba, to Violet and Tuck Cochrane, a bush pilot. The family relocated to Acton, Ontario, when Tom was four years old and later to Etobicoke, Ontario. He purchased his first guitar at age 11 by selling a toy train set. Cochrane attended Martingrove Collegiate Institute in the late 1960s. In the early 1970s, Tom was performing in coffee houses across Canada. He eventually made his way to Los Angeles where he found a job writing theme music for the movie My Pleasure Is My Business, the Xaviera Hollander story. Unable to find steady income from music, Cochrane returned to Toronto, where he drove a taxi cab and later took a job on a Caribbean cruise liner.

After meeting at the El Mocambo Tavern in Toronto, Cochrane joined the Canadian Rock Band Red Rider in 1978 and served as their lead singer and main songwriter for more than ten years. Red Rider included Ken Greer, Jeff Jones, Peter Boynton and Rob Baker. Bruce Allen managed the band from their debut until 1985. Cochrane recorded six studio albums with Red Rider plus a live album, a best of album, and a box set. By 1986, the band was billed as "Tom Cochrane & Red Rider".

In 2002, Cochrane reunited with his former Red Rider bandmates Greer and Jones and continues to perform with them today.


bruce cockburnBruce Cockburn was born in 1945 in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and spent some of his early years on a farm outside Pembroke, Ontario. He has stated in interviews that his first guitar was one he found around 1959 in his grandmother's attic, which he adorned with golden stars and used to play along to radio hits. Cockburn attended Nepean High School, where his 1964 yearbook photo states his desire "to become a musician".

Cockburn attended Berklee School of Music in Boston for three semesters between 1964 and 1966. In that year he joined an Ottawa band called The Children, which lasted for about a year. In the spring of 1967 he joined the final lineup of The Esquires. He moved to Toronto that summer to form The Flying Circus with former Bobby Kris & The Imperials members Marty Fisher and Gordon MacBain and ex-Tripp member Neil Lillie. The group recorded some material in late 1967 (which remains unreleased) before changing its name to Olivus in the spring of 1968, by which time Lillie (who changed his name to Neil Merryweather) had been replaced by Dennis Pendrith from Livingstone's Journey. Olivus opened for The Jimi Hendrix Experience and Cream in April 1968. That summer Cockburn broke up the band with the intention of going solo, but ended up in the band 3's a Crowd with David Wiffen, Colleen Peterson, and Richard Patterson, who had been a co-member of The Children. Cockburn left 3's a Crowd in the spring of 1969 to pursue a solo career.

Cockburn's first solo appearance was at the Mariposa Folk Festival in 1967, and in 1969 he was a headliner. In 1970 he released his self-titled, solo album. Cockburn's guitar work and songwriting won him an enthusiastic following. His early work featured rural and nautical imagery and Biblical metaphors. Raised as an agnostic, early in his career he became a Christian. Many of his albums from the 1970s refer to Christianity, which in turn informs his concerns for human rights and environmentalism. His references to Christianity include the Grail imagery of 20th-century Christian poet Charles Williams and the ideas of theologian Harvey Cox.

In 1970 Cockburn became partners with Bernie Finkelstein in the music publishing firm Golden Mountain Music.


Leonard CohenLeonard Norman Cohen was born on September 21, 1934 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. During his younger years, Cohen learned to play guitar, and around the same time, he began writing poetry and novels. Not long after graduating from McGill University, in 1955, Cohen decided to move to New York City.

By the mid-1960s, Cohen had become fascinated by the Greenwich Village folk scene and, with his background in music and writing, music composition was a natural step. He soon began to compose and release folk-rock and pop songs, and in 1967, made his musical debut at the Newport Folk Festival. The event spurred Cohen's fame, and he continued to perform publicly, at concerts in New York City, as well as on the television program Camera Three, a cultural affairs program that aired weekly on CBS at the time.

One of his most famous compositions is "Hallelujah," a song released on 1984's Various Positions. Cohen was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2008, and he received a Grammy Award for lifetime achievement in 2010.


Coney HatchConey Hatch is a Canadian hard rock band who released three albums in the 1980s. Based in Toronto, Ontario, the band consists of vocalist and guitarist Carl Dixon who would also go on to play with April Wine and a Burton Cummings-less Guess Who for several years, as well as touring solo and releasing at least two solo albums; vocalist and bassist Andy Curran who had his own solo album featuring the semi-hits, "License to Love" and "No Tattoos"; guitarist Steve Shelski who has written several instrumentals for TSN; and drummer Dave 'Thumper' Ketchum. They released their first album in 1982. Ketchum left the band in 1983, and was replaced by Barry Connors who formerly drummed with Toronto.

 


The Crew CutsThe Crew-Cuts were a Canadian vocal quartet, that made a number of popular records that charted in the United States and worldwide. They named themselves after the then popular crew cut haircut, one of the first connections made between pop music and hairstyle.

Although their first hit, "Crazy 'Bout You, Baby," was written by Maugeri and Barrett themselves, they quickly became specialists in cover recordings of originally-R&B songs. Their first cover, "Sh-Boom" (of which the R&B original was recorded by The Chords) hit #1 on the charts in 1954. A number of other hits followed including "Earth Angel" which rose to the number 2 spot on the charts and had great success in England and Australia.


The Cooper BrothersThe Cooper Brothers are a Canadian southern rock band founded in Ottawa, Ontario, by brothers Brian Cooper and Dick Cooper and their long-time friend Terry King. Starting in 1974, the band released several singles under the production guidance of Les Emmerson (of the Canadian rock group Five Man Electrical Band). The group had some early regional success with the tracks “Finally (With You)” and “Miss Lonelyhearts” under the Polydor label.

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David-FosterDavid Walter Foster, (born November 1, 1949), is a Canadian musician, record producer, composer, songwriter, and arranger. He has been a producer for notable musical artists including Christina Aguilera, Andrea Bocelli, Toni Braxton, Michael Bublé, Chicago, Natalie Cole, The Corrs, Céline Dion, Jackie Evancho, Kenny G, Josh Groban, Whitney Houston, Jennifer Lopez, Seal, Rod Stewart, Madonna, Barbra Streisand, and Westlife.  Foster has won 16 Grammy Awards from 47 nominations. Foster is also the chairman of Verve Music Group.

Foster was born in Victoria, British Columbia, the son of a maintenance yard superintendent and a homemaker. In 1963, at the age of 13, he enrolled in the University of Washington music program. In 1966, he joined a backup band for Chuck Berry. In his teens, he moved to England with the Victoria rock band, the Strangers, and then back to Toronto where he played with Ronnie Hawkins. In 1974, he moved to Los Angeles with his band Skylark.


DeFranco FamilyThe DeFranco Family, featuring Tony DeFranco, was a 1970s pop music group and family from Port Colborne, Ontario, Canada. The group, all siblings, consisted of guitarist Benny DeFranco (born 11 July 1953); keyboardist Marisa DeFranco (born 23 July 1954); guitarist Nino DeFranco (born 19 October 1955); drummer Merlina DeFranco (born 20 July 1957); and lead singer Tony DeFranco (born 31 August 1959).

The group had a number of hits between 1973 and 1977, including Abra-Ca-Dabra and their biggest hit, Heartbeat (It's a Love Beat). Either Tony DeFranco or the entire family appeared in almost every issue of a number of the teen magazines of this period, such as Tiger Beat and Flip. By the late 1970s, the group had faded from the pop scene.

 


 

Domenic TroianoDomenic Michele Antonio Troiano (January 17, 1946 – May 25, 2005) was a Canadian rock guitarist, most notable for his contributions to Mandala, The James Gang, The Guess Who and as a solo artist.Born in Modugno, Italy, Troiano became a naturalized Canadian in 1955.  He was raised in Toronto and began playing guitar at age 15. As a professional musician, he was a guitarist for Ronnie Hawkins, James Gang, The Guess Who and Bush, among others.

His first group of note was Robbie Lane & The Disciples, who were hired en masse to back singer Ronnie Hawkins upon the departure of Levon and the Hawks. In 1965, Troiano joined The Rogues who became The Five Rogues and comprised singer George Olliver, bass player Don Elliot,
keyboard player Josef Chirowski and drummer Pentti Glan.  In September 1966, the band changed its name to Mandala and recorded two singles, including the top ten hit, Opportunity in February 1967. Olliver and Chirowski left later that year and were replaced by Roy Kenner and organist Henry Babraj. With yet another organist, Hugh Sullivan, the group scored another big Canadian hit in 1968 with Love-itis on Atlantic Records and issued an LP, Soul Crusade. The band formally broke up in June 1969, but Troiano, Kenner, Sullivan and Glan soon regrouped as Bush, with bassist Prakash John. Kenner also later sang in the James Gang with Troiano, who left in the mid-1970s to play with The Guess Who.

He performed with the Domenic Troiano Band in the late 1970s  and scored his biggest hit with the 1979 Disco-themed We All Need Love. He also wrote music for television including the series Night Heat. Songs composed by Troiano, such as I Can Hear You Calling, have been performed by other artists including Three Dog Night. His guitar work can be heard on recordings by Moe Koffman, Joe Cocker, James Cotton and Long John Baldry.  He also had a Canadian release with the band Black Market with the original  Independent label El Mocambo Records. For nearly twenty-five years, beginning in the early 1980s, Troiano concentrated on contributing to the work of others,  as a musician and as a producer, rather than enhancing his own solo career.

 


 

Born in Montreal, Quebec, Jerry Doucette's family moved to Hamilton, Ontario, when he was four. He received his first guitar when he was six.

Doucette joined numerous bands prior to his solo career, starting with The Reefers, at the age of 11. He migrated to Toronto, Ontario, and played in the final incarnation of Brutus. Doucette moved to Vancouver, British Columbia, in 1972. Doucette worked in bands with Lindsay Mitchell and Rocket Norton, both of whom later joined Prism. He subsequently signed a solo recording deal with Mushroom Records, and commenced recording under his surname only.

Mama Let Him Play, the single from the first Doucette album release of the same name, in the fall of 1977 earned platinum status (sales of 100,000 units) in Canada, plus substantial publicity and tour promotion. The single and record were not successful to the same degree in the United States,
though the single charted in the Billboard Top 100 and the album in the Billboard 200. The recording band for the single and album was composed of Duris Maxwell on drums, Brent Shindell on guitar, Don Cummings on bass and Robbie King on keyboards.


Celine DionCéline Marie Claudette Dion, born 30 March 1968, is a Canadian singer, songwriter, businesswoman and occasional actress. Born into a large family from Charlemagne, Quebec, Dion emerged as a teen star in the French-speaking world after her manager and future husband René Angélil mortgaged his home to finance her first record. In 1990, she released the English-language album Unison, establishing herself as a viable pop artist in North America and other English-speaking areas of the world.

Dion first gained international recognition in the 1980s by winning both the 1982 Yamaha World Popular Song Festival and the 1988 Eurovision Song Contest where she represented Switzerland. Following a series of French albums in the early 1980s, she signed on to CBS Records Canada in 1986.

In 2004, after surpassing 175 million in album sales worldwide, she was presented with the Chopard Diamond Award at the World Music Awards for becoming the best-selling female artist of all time. Dion remains the best-selling Canadian artist in history and one of the best-selling artists of all time with album sales of more than 200 million copies worldwide.


The DiamondsThe Diamonds are a Canadian vocal quartet that rose to prominence in the 1950s and early 1960s with 16 Billboard hit records. The original members were Dave Somerville (lead), Ted Kowalski (tenor), Phil Levitt (baritone), and Bill Reed (bass). They were most noted for interpreting and introducing rhythm and blues vocal group music to the wider pop music audience.

The Diamonds’ first recording for Mercury was "Why Do Fools Fall in Love" (originated by Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers), which reached #12 in the U.S. as their first hit, and their follow-up hit single, "Church Bells May Ring" (originally by The Willows), reached #14 in the U.S.

The Diamonds' biggest hits were 1957's "Little Darlin'" (originally recorded by The Gladiolas, written by Maurice Williams) and "The Stroll" (1957), an original song written for the group by Clyde Otis, from an idea by Dick Clark.

Although they were signed to do rock and roll, Mercury also paired them with jazz composer and arranger Pete Rugolo, in one of his Meet series recordings. The album, entitled The Diamonds Meet Pete Rugolo, allowed them to return to their roots and do some established standards.

The group sang "Little Darlin'" and "Where Mary Go" in the film The Big Beat, and sang the theme song for another film, Kathy-O.

Their television appearances included the TV shows of Steve Allen, Perry Como, Vic Damone, Tony Bennett, Eddy Arnold and Paul Winchell. They also appeared on American Bandstand.

In the late 1950s Reed, Kowalski and Levitt left the group and were replaced by Mike Douglas, John Felten and Evan Fisher.

After Dave Somerville left the group in 1961 to pursue a folk singing career as "David Troy", he was replaced by Jim Malone. There were no more hit records by The Diamonds after Somerville left. Throughout the 1960s and 1970s The Diamonds performed mostly in Las Vegas led, at first, by Mike Douglas, later being continued by Glenn Stetson. At one time, there were at least two groups performing under The Diamonds name, the other principally being led by John Felten until his death on May 17, 1982, in a plane crash. This created an issue in the late 1980s that ultimately went to court. The right to the use the name "The Diamonds" was awarded to Gary Owens (a member of Felten's group) with the original members being allowed to use their name on special occasions each year. Owens, along with members Bob Duncan, Steve Smith (both former members of Lawrence Welk's band and television program) and Gary Cech, released an album in 1987, "Diamonds Are Forever", which contained two songs that entered the lower reaches of the Country Music Charts, "Just a Little Bit" and "Two Kinds Of Women". As of 2014, this "trademark" group still tours with Owen, Jerry Siggins, Sean Sooter, and Jeff Dolan.


Doug and the SlugsDoug and the Slugs are a Canadian pop music group formed in 1977 in Vancouver. They are best remembered for the Canadian top 40 hits "Too Bad" (1980), "Making It Work" (1983) and "Tomcat Prowl" (1988).

After some turnover amongst Slugs in the early months, the lineup stabilized by 1978, and for the entirety of their recording career (1978–1992), Doug & the Slugs consisted of lead vocalist Doug Bennett, guitarists Richard Baker and John Burton, keyboardist Simon Kendall, bassist Steve Bosley, and drummer John "Wally" Watson.

Throughout the 1980s, a string of singles and albums followed. Their biggest success was 1982's Music For The Hard Of Thinking, which in Canada peaked at #22, and spun off two top 40 singles: "Who Knows How To Make Love Stay" and "Making It Work". However, the band didn't break through internationally, and RCA ended their distribution deal with Ritdong in 1984, after the release of the best-of compilation Ten Big Ones.

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Edward BearEdward Bear was a Toronto-based Canadian pop-rock group, formed originally in 1966 by Larry Evoy and Craig Hemming. The band signed with Capitol Records in 1969 with a lineup of Evoy, Danny Marks and Paul Weldon. Marks left the band the following year and was succeeded by Roger Ellis. The band had several chart successes in the early 1970s before disbanding in 1974. Their name is derived from A.A. Milne's Winnie the Pooh, whose "proper" name is Edward Bear. Their top selling singles include "You, Me and Mexico", "Last Song", and "Close Your Eyes", all three of which were Top 5 hits in Canada and charted well in the United States.

The band had its biggest hit in 1972, when "Last Song" charted at #1 in Canada and peaked at #3 in the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. It was awarded a gold disc in March 1973 for selling over one million copies by the Recording Industry Association of America. By then, the band's original line up had split up. Evoy remained as the primary songwriter and creative force throughout the band's career, rebuilding the band twice, until it finally was disbanded in 1974.

They won a Juno Award in 1973 for outstanding group performance.


ESQUIRES 1965The Esquires were a Canadian band, based in Ottawa, active from 1962 to 1967. The band is notable as the recipient of the first Juno Award in Canada, as well as being one of Canada's earlier pop music recording acts.  The first Canadian music video ever made is said to be that of an Esquires song.
The band is also notable as having had Bruce Cockburn as a later member,  and also for one of its hit records, "It's A Dirty Shame", having been written by William Hawkins.

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FMFM is a Canadian progressive rock music group formed in 1976 in Toronto. The band existed from 1976 to 1996, with a brief return in 2006, although they had a period of inactivity between 1989 and 1994. Their music has been categorized as space rock, and lyrics are dominated by science fiction themes. In November 2011, Cameron Hawkins reformed the band with two new players.
The band's original 1976 lineup and presentation was very unusual; it consisted of just 2 people: Cameron Hawkins, appearing as a typical rock star at the front of the stage, playing synthesizer, occasional bass guitar, and lead vocals; and Nash the Slash, a mysterious figure in dark clothes lurking in the shadows at the back of the stage, playing electric violin, electric mandolin, backing vocals, and operating a drum machine. Aside from Cameron's bass, the group did not use guitars. The duo first met each other while they were jamming with a band called Clear.
The group first recorded in July 1976 when they performed live in the studio, an event which was videotaped for TVOntario’s Night Music Concert TV show, first broadcast on November 3. The half hour show, shown with no commercial breaks, presented the band playing three long pieces: "Phasors on Stun", "One O'Clock Tomorrow", and "Black Noise". It also included a nonsensical biography of the group resembling free-association poetry, recited by David Pritchard (electronic musician, record producer and CHUM-FM DJ, 1960s-1970s), accompanied by electronic background music and a collage of photos and artwork by Paul Till, appearing between the first and second songs. Neither this music, nor any performances by the original 2-person lineup, was released on an album until 2001.
FM's first public performance took place in November 1976 at the A Space art gallery in Toronto shortly after the TV show first aired.


fluddFludd was a Canadian rock band in the 1970s,
best known for their 1973 hit "Cousin Mary".

Its roots all started in a band called The Pretty Ones, formed by Ed Pilling and Greg Godovitz.  The band was briefly part of Toronto's Yorkville scene in the 1960s, but broke up before achieving much commercial success. Pilling and his brother Brian then moved to Birmingham, England, where they formed a band called Wages of Sin and spent some time touring as a backing band for Cat Stevens in 1970, but returned to Toronto by the end of that year. Inspired by the then-emerging psychedelic blues rock sound of British acts such as Small Faces, they then reunited with Godovitz, and recruited drummer John Andersen and guitarist Mick Walsh to create Fludd.

 

 

 


 

5 Man Electrical BandThe Five Man Electrical Band (originally known as The Staccatos from 1963–68) is a Canadian rock group from Ottawa. They had numerous hits in their native Canada, including the top 10 entries "Half Past Midnight" (1967) (as The Staccatos),  "Absolutely Right" (1971) and "I'm a Stranger Here" (1972). Internationally, they are best known for their 1971 hit single  "Signs".

 

 


A Foot in ColdwaterA Foot in Coldwater is a Canadian rock band composed of Alex Machin (vocals), Bob Horne (keyboard), Paul Naumann (guitar), Danny Taylor (drums), and Hughie Leggat (bass and vocals). They are best known for the song "(Make Me Do) Anything You Want" which was a Canadian hit single in 1972 and again in 1974.

A Foot in Coldwater was formed in Toronto in 1970 from three bands. Leggat, Taylor, and Horne had been members of Nucleus, and the Lords of London. Machin and Naumann were in the band Island. Together, they signed with Frank Davies of Daffodil Records, who coined the group's name.

The band's first album, A Foot in Coldwater, was released in 1972 with their first single "(Make Me Do) Anything You Want" which reached the top 25 on the Canadian charts. In 1973, they released their second album The Second Foot in Coldwater which included moderately successful singles "(Isn’t Love Unkind) In My Life" (#34) and "Love is Coming" (#27). In 1974, the band released a third album, All Around Us, which included a shorter version of "(Make Me Do) Anything You Want" which again made the Canadian singles chart. The song was later covered by the heavy metal band Helix in 1984. It is described as "a sleepy ballad" by AllMusic.

The band released one more single, "Midnight Lady" before Daffodil Records filed for bankruptcy in 1975, leaving them without a label. Horne left the group and the remaining members recorded a single, "Breaking Through" for Anthem in 1977, but it was not a success and the band folded.

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goddoGoddo is a Canadian rock band formed in Scarborough, Ontario in 1975.  Goddo had mixed major label success from the mid-1970s to the early 1980s.

Following a stint with Fludd, bassist Greg Godovitz formed Goddo with former Brutus guitarist Gino Scarpelli and former bus drummer Marty Morin. The band toured clubs in Canada with occasional forays into the United States. In 1975, they released the single "Louie Louie" on A & M Records Canada which helped them secure more work on the Southern Ontario bar circuit.

Marty Morin left in 1976 and was replaced by Doug Inglis on drums. In 1977, Goddo was signed to Polydor Records. Their self-titled debut album was released later that year.

The follow-up album, If Indeed It's Lonely At The Top...WHO CARES...It's Lonely At The Bottom Too! (1978), features a barbed view of rock and roll lifestyles and the music industry in general.

'An Act Of Goddo' followed in 1979 along with a live performance in Toronto. The performance, called 'An Act Of Goddo In Church', has since been re-issued on DVD as "Live".

Now with a new deal through Attic Records, Goddo decided to make a live album. 'Best Seat In The House' was recorded over two nights at the Roxy Theater in Barrie, Ontario and produced by Bob Segarini.

Goddo followed the live LP with what would become their most successful commercial release with called Pretty Bad Boys. The title track which spent more than 16 weeks on the Canadian charts. But within a year of the release the band was broke and without a recording contract and disbanded.

 


 

Grant Smith and the PowerGrant Smith & The Power were a popular Canadian (from Toronto) rock-soul outfit from the 1960s that had a hit with a cover of Jackie Edwards' "Keep On Running" (previously a big hit for The Spencer Davis Group) and was also a training ground for musicians who went on to the likes of McKenna Mendelson Mainline and Motherlode.

 


 

Glass TigerGlass Tiger is a Canadian rock band formed in 1980 from Newmarket, Ontario. The band features Alan Frew on lead vocals supported by Sam Reid (keyboards), Al Connelly (guitar), Wayne Parker (bass) and Michael Hanson (drums). Originally named Tokyo, the band was signed by EMI Music Canada after they opened for their touring artist Culture Club at Toronto's Maple Leaf Gardens in 1984.

Glass Tiger's debut album The Thin Red Line (1986) produced two hit international singles, "Don't Forget Me (When I'm Gone)" and "Someday," , and featured additional singles "I Will Be There and domestic single "You're What I Look For". The album set a record for being the fastest selling debut recording in Canadian history, going gold within weeks of its release.
To date, this album has received four Platinum records in Canada and went Gold in the United States.

Glass Tiger's sophomore release Diamond Sun, spawned domestic Canadian singles "Diamond Sun," "I'm Still Searching," "My Song," and "(Watching) Worlds Crumble," and achieved Double Platinum status in Canada.

Simple Mission, their third album, was not formally released in the USA, but it went Platinum in Canada and featured the singles "Animal Heart", and the Celtic duet "My Town" with Rod Stewart. "My Town" was also featured on a special 'Back-To-Back' series compilation in the early 90's and sold through EMI-Capitol's Special Market's division.

Several of Glass Tiger's songs were co-written and produced by Bryan Adams' collaborator, Jim Vallance. In fact, Adams makes a cameo in their top single "Don't Forget Me (When I'm Gone)". The band won three Juno Awards in 1986 and two more in 1987. They were also nominated for a Grammy Award in 1987. In late 1988, Chris McNeill (drums), a sought after session drummer joined the band, and the foursome have been touring and playing ever since.

Credit: http://www.last.fm/


The Guess WhoThe Guess Who are a Canadian rock band from Winnipeg, Manitoba. Initially gaining recognition in Canada, the group also found international success from the late 1960s through the mid-1970s with numerous hit singles, including "No Time", "American Woman", "These Eyes" and "Share the Land". Several former members of The Guess Who, notably Burton Cummings and Randy Bachman (of Bachman–Turner Overdrive), have found considerable success outside the band. Formed as a garage rock/rhythm and blues group during the rise of British beat, their musical style primarily consisted of pop rock, blues rock, psychedelic rock and hard rock.

The band was inducted into The Canadian Music Hall of Fame in 1987. In 2002, Randy Bachman, Burton Cummings, Garry Peterson, Donnie McDougall and Bill Wallace received the Governor General's Performing Arts Award for Lifetime Artistic Achievement, Canada's highest honour in the performing arts, for The Guess Who's contribution to popular music in Canada.

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harmoniumHarmonium was a Quebec progressive rock band formed in 1972 in Montreal.

Lead vocalist and guitarist Serge Fiori met Michel Normandeau (vocals and guitar) in a theatre music meeting on November 1972. Later on in 1973 they met bassist Louis Valois and became Harmonium.  In November 1973 the group performed their first air play on CHOM-FM.

 

 


headpinsHeadpins are a Canadian rock group, founded as a side project in the late 1970s by then Chilliwack members Ab Bryant and Brian MacLeod. Macleod was impressed by the vocal talents of Vancouver rock singer Denise McCann, and asked her to join his new venture. Originally, Matt Frenette played drums for The Headpins while Bernie Aubin played drums for fellow Vancouver band Loverboy but, within months, Aubin and Frenette swapped bands where each continues to play to the present. The Headpins began gigging around the Vancouver area throughout 1981, quickly building a fan base. McCann left at the end of that first year, and MacLeod brought in Darby Mills to provide lead vocals.

They released their debut album Turn It Loud in 1982, which quickly went platinum and topped the charts for 6 weeks, with the hit single "Don't It Make Ya Feel". Their second release, Line of Fire, was another multi-platinum success, and included the hits "Just One More Time" and "Feel It (Feel My Body)", resulting in the band touring Europe with Whitesnake at the beginning of 1984. Mills received much attention and won accolades with fans polls voting her best singer. In 1985 the Headpins toured with many acts such as Kiss, Eddie Money and ZZ Top. The band was in middle of recording their third album, Head Over Heels, when their record company went bankrupt. They were part of ZZ Top's Afterburner Tour and were slated to go down the eastern seaboard (of the US) with the band. ZZ Top didn't like the attention that the opening act was getting, and the Headpins were told not to do an encore number. As it turns out, MacLeod decided not to listen, and they were removed from the bill. In 1986, Mills left for a solo project and was replaced by Chrissy Steele. Later, Steele went on to make her own band with MacLeod and signed with Chrysalis Records, although the outfit was soon dropped by the label. She ended up having two hits, "Love You 'Til It Hurts" and the ballad, "Love Don't Last Forever."

Headpins continue to perform live with Darby, Ab and Bernie from the classic 80's line-up.


HelixHelix is a Canadian hard rock/heavy metal band. They formed in 1974, and are best known for their 1984 single "Rock You". The original lineup was formed by drummer Bruce Arnold, and consisted of lead vocalist Brian Vollmer, guitarists Ron Watson and Rick "Minstrel" Trembley, keyboardist Don Simmons, and bassist Keith "Bert" Zurbrigg. However, their most well known lineup, and the one that recorded "Rock You", was the 80s version of the band: Vollmer on vocals, accompanied by guitarists Brent "The Doctor" Doerner and Paul Hackman, bassist Daryl Gray, and drummer Greg "Fritz" Hinz. The history of the band has been marked by many lineup changes, with Vollmer being the sole constant member and only remaining member of the original lineup. Although Hackman was killed in a tour bus accident in 1992, the surviving members of the 80s lineup reunited in 2009 for an album and have continued to tour since 2011.


Honeymoon SuiteHoneymoon Suite is a Canadian hard rock/glam metal band formed in 1981 in Niagara Falls. The band's name was a nod to the fact that Niagara Falls is the unofficial honeymoon capital.

The band was originally formed in 1981 by Johnnie Dee (vocals, guitar), Co-founder Brad Bent (keyboards, Vocals), and Mike Lengyell (drums, formerly with The Diodes). After exhausting tours to sold out shows, great audience praise of the vocal pairings of Dee and Bent, rock solid Lengyell drumming, and the overall unique originality of the band, they took a Hiatus. By 1983, the line-up changed, with Dee (the only original remaining member) now on rhythm guitar and lead vocals, along with new recruits Derry Grehan on lead guitar and Dave Betts on drums. Grehan became the band's primary songwriter, and penned "New Girl Now," which won them an unsigned band contest put on by Toronto radio station Q107.

Various keyboard players and bassists came and left during this time, but on the strength of "New Girl Now," WEA Canada signed the band to the label. Ray Coburn was added as a permanent new member on keyboards as the sessions got underway for the group's debut LP, but the band still had no bass player, so bassist Brian Brackstone was recruited as a session player. Brackstone played on the entire album; bassist Gary Lalonde (formerly with Rose and Toronto) was added to the line-up after the album was completed, and appeared in the album's group photos and played with the band live.

The band's self-titled debut album, produced by Tom Treumuth, was released in June, 1984. The album featured four charting hits in Canada: a completely re-recorded version of "New Girl Now," "Burning In Love," "Wave Babies," and "Stay In the Light." All were written by Grehan. "New Girl Now" was also Honeymoon Suite's first single to reach the top-50 in the United States.

Their follow up album, The Big Prize, produced by Bruce Fairbairn, was equally successful in Canada, with four more hits: "Bad Attitude," "Feel It Again," "What Does It Take," and "All Along You Knew." Grehan still wrote the lion's share of the band's material, but Dee and Coburn also contributed songs to this album; "Feel It Again", a Coburn composition, reached the Top 40 in the US, while Grehan's "What Does It Take" reached no. 52, buoyed by its inclusion on the soundtrack for the John Cusack film One Crazy Summer. In 1989, "Bad Attitude" was featured in the series finale of Miami Vice, played during a Ferrari driving segment that mirrored one from the series' pilot episode.

In 1986, keyboardist Ray Coburn left the band, replaced by Rob Preuss of Burlington, Ontario-based Spoons. Also during 1986, the band produced the track "Those Were the Days" for the Charlie Sheen film The Wraith.

In the spring of 1987, the band performed the title track for the Mel Gibson film Lethal Weapon, which was composed by Michael Kamen. In the winter of 1987, the band started work on their third album in L.A. Unfortunately, Johnnie Dee was hit by a car at LAX airport, breaking his leg in several places, and required surgery to insert a ten-inch pin to help the leg heal properly. While Dee was recovering in the hospital, one-time Doobie Brothers member Michael McDonald was brought in to help out with the recording sessions; he wrote lyrics and sang back up on "Long Way Back," a forthcoming track for their next album.

In 1988, their third album was finally released: Racing After Midnight, produced by Ted Templeman (of Van Halen fame) and Jeff Hendrickson. That album made the top 10 in Canada, but was not as successful in the U.S. Singles included "Love Changes Everything," "Looking Out for Number One," "Cold Look" (Europe only), and "It's Over Now." By now, while Grehan was still the primary songwriter, Dee and Preuss frequently co-wrote with Grehan.

In 1989, the band released their first greatest hits compilation, The Singles, which included two new charting singles in Canada: "Still Loving You" and "Long Way," both written by Grehan. Preuss left and Coburn rejoined the band in time to embark on "The Singles" tour, which would turn out to be the last tour featuring the band's classic line-up until 2007.


Ronnie HawkinsRonald "Ronnie" Hawkins born January 10, 1935 is a rockabilly musician whose career has spanned more than half a century. Though his career began in Arkansas, US, where he'd been born and raised, it was in Ontario, Canada where he found success and settled for most of his life. He is considered highly influential in the establishment and evolution of rock music in Canada.

Also known as "Rompin' Ronnie", "Mr. Dynamo", or simply "The Hawk", he was one of the key players in the 1960s rock scene in Toronto. Throughout his career, Hawkins has performed all across North America and recorded more than twenty-five albums. His hit songs included covers of Chuck Berry's "Thirty Days" (entitled "Forty Days" by Hawkins) and Young Jessie's "Mary Lou", a song about a "gold digging woman". Other well-known recordings are "Who Do You Love?", "Hey Bo Diddley", and "Susie Q", which was written by his cousin, the late rockabilly artist Dale Hawkins.

Hawkins is also notable for his role as something of a talent scout and mentor. He played a pivotal role in the establishment of premiere backing musicians via his band, The Hawks. The most successful of those eventually formed The Band, while other musicians Hawkins had recruited provided the makings of Robbie Lane & The Disciples, Janis Joplin's Full Tilt Boogie Band, Crowbar, Bearfoot, and Skylark.


Cory HartCorey Mitchell Hart (born May 31, 1962) is a Canadian singer, best known for his hit singles "Sunglasses at Night" and "Never Surrender". He has sold over 16 million records worldwide and scored nine US Billboard Top 40 hits. In Canada Hart has amassed 30 Top 40 hits, including 11 in the Top 10, over the course of 30 years in the music industry. Nominated for the Grammy Award for Best New Artist in 1984, Hart is also a multiple Juno award nominee and winner in Canada. He has also been honoured by the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) and the Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada (SOCAN).

Hart's first experience as a performing artist came at age 11, when he sang "Ben" for Tom Jones in Miami. He also recorded songs with Paul Anka in Las Vegas during this time period. In 1980 Hart represented Canada in the World Popular Song Festival in Tokyo (along with singer Dan Hill), marking his first public performance of original material. Hart also met Grammy-winning singer-songwriter Christopher Cross at the competition. Back in Canada, Hart reached out to Billy Joel who was on tour in the Montreal area at the time. Joel's backup band contacted him and Hart ended up recording several demos with them in Long Island, New York. Hart worked with several other notable Canadian studio musicians on demos before finally signing to a major label, Aquarius Records, in 1982 at the age of 20. Several songs on his first album, such as "The World is Fire," reflect the many rejections and tribulations Hart encountered along the path to getting a recording contract.

Released in 1983, First Offense featured the US Billboard Top 10 hit song "Sunglasses at Night" (No. 7) and Top 20 follow-up single "It Ain't Enough" (No. 17). The album went platinum in the United States and quadruple platinum in Canada. First Offense initially received a modest response upon its Canadian release. It was only after garnering US success in the summer of 1984 that he became a superstar in his native Canada, a source of some consternation for Hart.

The Juno-award winning video for "Sunglasses at Night" (directed by Rob Quartly) which featured a futuristic, Orwellian society helped propel the popularity of the track and led to Hart being instantly recognized worldwide.

Hart's second album was Boy in the Box, released in June 1985, which reached Diamond status in Canada (one million copies sold) by February 1986. It was only the second album by a Canadian artist ever to do so. The album featured the hit single "Never Surrender" which spent nine consecutive weeks at No. 1 in Canada and peaked at No. 3 on the US Billboard Top 40, also earning Hart an ASCAP Award as one of the most played songs of 1985. "Never Surrender" was the No. 2 song in the year-end Canadian charts in 1985, finishing second only to the Northern Lights charity single "Tears Are Not Enough" in which Hart had also participated, alongside veteran Canadian artists like Gordon Lightfoot, Neil Young, Joni Mitchell and 1980s chart rival Bryan Adams. Subsequent singles all charted in the Canadian and US Top 40 ("Boy in the Box," "Everything in My Heart" and "Eurasian Eyes"). In the US, Boy in the Box peaked at No. 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 and went platinum.

Fields of Fire, Hart's third album release, came out in fall 1986 and promptly went double platinum in Canada and achieved gold status in the US. It featured the US Top 20 hit single "I Am By Your Side," as well as the Canadian No. 1 single "Can't Help Falling in Love", originally performed by Elvis Presley. This was the first recorded cover version of a song Hart had released to date. The song was also a top 10 hit in the Philippines and Japan. Critics generally agreed that Fields of Fire displayed a new, more mature direction in Hart's songwriting.

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ironhorseIronhorse was a Canadian rock band from Vancouver, formed by the former The Guess Who and Bachman-Turner Overdrive member, Randy Bachman along with Tom Sparks (vocals, guitars),
Chris Leighton (drums) and Ron Foos (bass).

They had a minor U.S. hit single in April 1979 with "Sweet Lui-Louise", which peaked at #36 on the
Billboard Hot 100 chart. In Canada, the song peaked slightly higher at #26. The same track reached #60 in the UK Singles Chart. Ironhorse released two albums on the Scotti Brothers label: 1979's Ironhorse and 1980's Everything is Grey. The second release had Frank Ludwig (ex-Trooper) replacing Sparks.  One of its singles, "What's Your Hurry Darlin',"  peaked at #84 in Canada. In the U.S., the song peaked at #89 in May 1980.

 


Ian and SylviaIan & Sylvia were a Canadian folk and country music duo which consisted of Ian and Sylvia Tyson, née Fricker. They began performing together in 1959, married in 1964, and divorced and stopped performing together in 1975.

Ian & Sylvia started performing together in Toronto in 1959. By 1962, they were living in New York City where they caught the attention of manager Albert Grossman, who managed Peter, Paul and Mary and would soon become Bob Dylan's manager. Grossman secured them a contract with Vanguard Records and they released their first album late in the year.

Ian & Sylvia's first and self-titled album on Vanguard Records consisted mainly of traditional songs. There were British and Canadian folk songs, spiritual music, and a few blues songs thrown into the mix. The album was moderately successful and they made the list of performers for the 1963 Newport Folk Festival.

Four Strong Winds, their second album, was similar to the first, with the exception of the inclusion of the early Dylan composition, "Tomorrow is a Long Time", and the title song "Four Strong Winds", which was written by Ian. "Four Strong Winds" was a major hit in Canada and ensured their stardom.

Ian and Sylvia married in June 1964. They also released their third album, Northern Journey, that year. The album included a blues song written by Sylvia, "You Were On My Mind", which was subsequently recorded by both the California group We Five (a 1965 #1 on the Cashbox chart, #3 on the Billboard Hot 100) and British folk-rock singer Crispian St. Peters (#36 in 1967). A recording of "Four Strong Winds" by Bobby Bare made it to #3 on the country charts around that time.

On the Northern Journey album was the song "Someday Soon", a composition by Ian that would rival "Four Strong Winds" in its popularity. Both songs would eventually be recorded by dozens of singers.

Their fourth album, Early Morning Rain, consisted in large part of new songs. They introduced the work of fellow Canadian songwriter and performer Gordon Lightfoot through the title song and "(That's What You Get) For Lovin' Me". They also recorded songs "Darcy Farrow" by Steve Gillette and Tom Campbell, being the first artists to record these three songs. Additionally, they recorded a number of their own compositions.

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Andy KimAndrew Youakim, performing as Andy Kim, is a Canadian pop rock singer and songwriter. He grew up in Montreal, Quebec. He is known for a number of hit singles that he released in the late 1960s and early 1970s such as "Rock Me Gently", which topped the US singles chart. In 1968, he co-wrote "Sugar, Sugar" for The Archies. It was #1 for four weeks and in 1969 was certified "Record of the Year" by the RIAA.

He has recorded under the stage name Baron Longfellow since the mid-1980s or just as Longfellow in the early 1990s.

Andy Youakim was born in Montreal, Quebec, on 5 December in either 1946 (as cited by VH1, United Press International, and Rolling Stone), or 1952 (as cited by sources including Allmusic and Billboard Books). Various published interviews with Kim from the mid-1970s support the 1946 dating, while Kim's current biography on his official website offers no specific year of birth.

Youakim is the third of four sons of Lebanese immigrants. He moved to New York to pursue a career in music. If the 1952 birthdate is correct, then he was only 10 or 11 when he issued his first single in 1963. He recorded as "Andy Kim", using the different last name as a way to obscure his Lebanese ethnicity, though on his earliest releases he still used the name "Youakim" in the writing credits.

In 1968, after minor recording successes over the previous few years, Kim released the single "How'd We Ever Get This Way?" on the Steed label; it just missed the U.S. Top 20, reaching number 21.

Also in 1968, with Jeff Barry, Kim co-wrote "Sugar, Sugar" which was a hit single for The Archies, reaching #1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 and ultimately becoming the RIAA Record of the Year. Kim & Barry wrote more songs for the Archies, and also for Changes, from The Monkees in 1970, which Barry produced.

In 1969, Kim had two hit singles, "Rainbow Ride", which made the US Top 50, and "Baby, I Love You", which got to #9 and was popular enough in Canada to earn him a Gold Leaf (Juno) Award in 1970 as his country's Best Male Vocalist. "Baby, I Love You" sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc by the R.I.A.A. in October 1969.

Over the next few years, Kim recorded a few minor hits (such as "Be My Baby" in late 1970) and toured North America extensively. In the spring of 1974, he released the self-penned "Rock Me Gently", which went to #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, and rose to #2 on the UK Singles Chart. "Rock Me Gently" sold three million copies globally, earning Kim his second gold disc.

Kim had shied away from touring for years before then, when he was working with the Steed label. He has said that he had created a person in his music in the vein of a white blond surfer and that fans were shocked to see his dark skin color and appearance. As well, he had altered his voice on his earlier records to sound younger.[2]

By the end of 1976, Kim stopped recording and disappeared from public life. He returned under the stage name 'Baron Longfellow' with a self-titled album Baron Longfellow in 1980 and, also under the same pseudonym, in 1984 released Prisoner by Design. Both of these albums met with moderate success. In 1991, Kim again went by the name 'Longfellow' and recorded the single "Powerdrive", which received radio airplay on several radio stations across Canada.

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gordon  lightfootGordon Meredith Lightfoot, Jr. (born November 17, 1938) is a Canadian singer-songwriter who achieved international success in folk, folk-rock, and country music, and has been credited for helping define the folk-pop sound of the 1960s and 1970s. He has been referred to as Canada's greatest songwriter and internationally as a folk-rock legend.

Lightfoot's songs, including "For Lovin' Me", "Early Morning Rain", "Steel Rail Blues", "Ribbon of Darkness"—a number one hit on the U.S. country chart with Marty Robbins's cover in 1965— and the 1967 Detroit riot-generated "Black Day in July", brought him international recognition in the 1960s.  He experienced chart success in Canada with his own recordings, beginning in 1962 with the No. 3 hit "(Remember Me) I'm the One".  Lightfoot's recordings then made an impact on the international music charts as well in the 1970s, with songs such as "If You Could Read My Mind" (1970) (No. 5 on the US chart), "Sundown" (1974), "Carefree Highway" (1974), "Rainy Day People" (1975), all reaching No. 1, and "The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald" (1976) (No. 2).

Some of Lightfoot's albums have achieved gold and multi-platinum status internationally.  His songs have been recorded by some of the world's most renowned recording artists, including Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Hank Williams Jr., The Kingston Trio, Marty Robbins, Jerry Lee Lewis, Neil Young, Bob Dylan, Judy Collins, Barbra Streisand, Johnny Mathis, Herb Alpert, Harry Belafonte, Scott Walker, Sarah McLachlan, Eric Clapton, John Mellencamp, Jack Jones, Bobby Vee, Roger Whittaker, Peter, Paul and Mary, Glen Campbell, The Irish Rovers, Nico, Olivia Newton-John and Paul Weller.

Robbie Robertson of the Band described Lightfoot as "a national treasure". Bob Dylan, also a Lightfoot fan, called him one of his favourite songwriters and, in an often-quoted tribute, Dylan observed that when he heard a Lightfoot song he wished "it would last forever". Lightfoot was a featured musical performer at the opening ceremonies of the 1988 Winter Olympic Games in Calgary, Alberta. He received an honorary Doctor of Laws degree (arts) in 1979 and the Companion of the Order of Canada—Canada's highest civilian honour—in 2003. In November 1997, Lightfoot was awarded the Governor General's Performing Arts Award, Canada's highest honour in the performing arts. On February 6, 2012, Lightfoot was presented with the Queen Elizabeth II  Diamond Jubilee Medal by the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario. In June that year he was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. On June 6, 2015,  Lightfoot received an honorary doctorate of music in his hometown of Orillia from Lakehead University.


LoverboyLoverboy is a Canadian rock group formed in 1979 in Calgary, Alberta. Loverboy's hit singles, particularly "Turn Me Loose" and "Working for the Weekend", have become arena rock staples and are still heard on many classic rock and classic hits radio stations across the United States and Canada. The band is currently based in Vancouver.

Throughout the 1980s, Loverboy accumulated numerous hit songs in Canada and the United States, earning four multi-platinum albums and selling millions of records. After being rejected by many American record labels, they signed with Columbia/CBS Records Canada and began recording their first album on March 20, 1980. Loverboy's founding members were Mike Reno (previously with Moxy as Mike Rynoski) on lead vocals, Paul Dean (previously with Streetheart and Scrubbaloe Caine) on guitars and vocals, Jim Clench (formerly of April Wine and BTO) on bass guitar (replaced shortly after by Scott Smith), Doug Johnson on keyboards, and Matt Frenette (also formerly of Streetheart) on drums.

It has been stated by Reno that their name was chosen due to a dream by Paul Dean. He had come up with the name after spending the previous night with some of the band mates including Reno and their girlfriends before going to the movies. The girlfriends were browsing through fashion magazines, where the guys in the band saw a Cover Girl advertisement. Cover Girl became Cover Boy, and then became Loverboy in Dean's dream later that night. After being told by Dean about the dream the next morning, Reno agreed to try it out and it stuck.

Originally rejected by all the major record labels in the United States, the band signed with Columbia Records of Canada, and on March 20, 1980, Loverboy went into the studio with producer Bruce Fairbairn and engineer Bob Rock to record what would be their self-titled debut album.

The band's follow-up album, Get Lucky, released in October 1981 when they were opening for Journey, included the hit tracks "Working for the Weekend" and "When It's Over". It became their best selling album in the U.S., reaching No. 7 on the Billboard album charts and selling over four million copies. In the same year Loverboy received six Juno Awards (Canada's highest award for music) in one year, a record that still stands today.

Loverboy released their third album, Keep It Up, in November 1983. Its first single "Hot Girls in Love" became their most successful to that date, reaching No. 11 on the U.S. charts. The video for the song as well as for the follow-up single "Queen of the Broken Hearts" were hugely popular on MTV, and the band embarked on its first tour as headliners.

In 1984 Loverboy recorded the United States Team theme for the 1984 Summer Olympics, "Nothing's Gonna Stop You Now." The song originally appeared on The Official Music of the 1984 Games but not on any of their albums or compilations to date.

In 1986 the band recorded "Heaven in Your Eyes", a song featured in the movie Top Gun, which peaked at No. 9 on the Billboard charts. However, Doug Johnson refused to appear in the video as he felt that the film glorified war, which Doug was highly against.


LighthouseLighthouse is a Canadian rock band formed in 1968 in Toronto. Their sound included horns, string instruments, and vibraphone; their music reflected elements of rock music, jazz, classical music, and swing. They won Juno Awards for Best Canadian Group of the Year in 1972, 1973 and 1974.

Lighthouse was formed in 1968 in Toronto by vocalist/drummer Skip Prokop (formerly of the Paupers) and keyboardist Paul Hoffert. The two met by coincidence on a flight from New York City to Toronto, and discussed forming a band structured around a rock rhythm section, jazz horn section, and classical string section. Prokop had admired Ralph Cole's playing when they shared the bill at the Grande Ballroom in Detroit, so he brought him to Toronto to be the band's guitarist. Prokop and Hoffert assembled the rest of the group from friends, studio session musicians, and Toronto Symphony Orchestra members, and proceeded to make a demo recording. On the advice of Richie Havens, Prokop and Hoffert took the demo to MGM Records in New York, who signed the band. Two days later they had a manager, Vinnie Fusco, out of Albert Grossman's office, who overturned the MGM contract and made a deal with RCA Victor. Lighthouse made its debut on May 14, 1969, at the Rock Pile in Toronto, introduced by Duke Ellington with the words, "I'm beginning to see the Light...house".

In 1971, Lighthouse released One Fine Morning and Thoughts of Movin' On. The title track from One Fine Morning was a hit in Canada, peaking at #2 on Canada's Singles Chart. The song was also an international and American hit, peaking at #24 in 1971 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, with both albums 'going gold' in Canada. It was preceded on the Canadian charts by "Hats Off to the Stranger" (#9 in Canada).

The band released Good Day in 1974. The album produced no hits, but did contain "Wide-Eyed Lady", a song co-written by Bob McBride. Back at Thunder Sounds Recording Studios, the band turned a few tracks on an album before Prokop left. The album was never completed. GRT released The Best of Lighthouse to capitalize on their past success. Ralph Cole took the band out for another couple of tours but in 1976 Lighthouse disbanded.

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Joni MitchellRoberta Joan "Joni" Mitchell, (born November 7, 1943) is a Canadian singer-songwriter and painter. Mitchell's work is highly respected by critics, and she has deeply influenced fellow musicians in a diverse range of genres. Rolling Stone has called her "one of the greatest songwriters ever", and AllMusic has stated, "When the dust settles, Joni Mitchell may stand as the most important and influential female recording artist of the late 20th century". Her lyrics are noted for their developed poetics, addressing social and environmental ideals alongside personal feelings of romantic longing,
confusion, disillusion, and joy.

Mitchell began singing in small nightclubs in Saskatchewan and Western Canada and then busking in the streets and dives of Toronto. In 1965, she moved to the United States and began touring. Some of her original songs ("Urge for Going", "Chelsea Morning", "Both Sides, Now", "The Circle Game") were covered by folk singers, allowing her to sign with Reprise Records and record her debut album in 1968.[4] Settling in Southern California, Mitchell, with popular songs like "Big Yellow Taxi" and "Woodstock", helped define an era and a generation. Her 1971 recording Blue was rated the 30th best album ever made in Rolling Stone's list of the "500 Greatest Albums of All Time". Mitchell switched labels and began moving toward jazz rhythms by way of lush pop textures on 1974's Court and Spark, her best-selling LP, featuring the radio hits "Help Me" and "Free Man in Paris".

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Payola$The Payolas (or Payola$) were part of Vancouver's new wave of bands and active in the Canadian music scene for a decade from the late 1970s, recording several albums and singles that were Canadian chart hits. They disbanded in 1988, but reformed again from 2003 to 2008, issuing a new EP in 2007.

The band's name is a reference to the payola scandal in the United States in the early 1960s. The group was based in Vancouver, British Columbia, and recorded mostly at Vancouver's Little Mountain Sound Studios. Through several lineup changes and name changes (the band also played as The Payola$, Paul Hyde and the Payolas and Rock and Hyde), the Payolas core members remained Paul Hyde and Bob Rock, who together wrote virtually all of the band's songs. As well, Rock engineered and mixed virtually every Payolas recording.

Although in the 1980s the Payolas always seemed poised for a big international breakthrough, the band never quite broke out despite their artistic growth and popular success in Canada. They were, however, one of the most prominent and successful platinum-selling Canadian bands of the early 1980s.

1982 saw drummer Chris Taylor added to the band lineup, replacing Taylor Little. Kelsey left the band and was not replaced. This line-up recorded the Mick Ronson-produced album No Stranger To Danger. Incorporating elements of reggae, pop, punk, and new wave, the LP included a bona fide hit (No. 4) in “Eyes of a Stranger”, which later earned the Juno for best single of the year. Junos were also given to Rock and Hyde for their songwriting, and to the band as a whole for Most Promising Group. Bob Rock’s recording work on the album also won him a Juno, and the LP also featured the moderately successful single “Romance”. Even the non-album B-side “Soldier” was a minor Canadian hit (No. 25). When the Payola$ toured the album in 1982, Ronson played keyboards as a guest performer.

For the first several years of their existence, the Payolas unsuccessfully tried to break into the U.S. market while dealing with strong radio resistance to their name. The Payolas lack of State-side exposure was attributed in some quarters to the possibility that American radio programmers were refusing to play any Payolas music simply because the band's name would remind the public of one of the radio industry's greatest scandals (and its ongoing practices). Therefore, under a certain amount of record company pressure — but also because they legitimately wanted to crack the lucrative U.S. market — the band softened their formerly hard-edged tunes, and in 1985 altered their name to Paul Hyde and the Payolas. In this way, radio DJs could play Payolas music, but simply announce the artist as "Paul Hyde" if they wanted to avoid uttering the dreaded "p" word on-air.

Around this same time, the record label recruited top industry pop-music wiz, David Foster, to produce and also assist in writing the band's next recording. The label clearly wanted the next release to break the band into the US mainstream and a more pop-orientated direction was chosen. By this point, the band consisted of Hyde, Rock, drummer Chris Taylor, and bassist Alex "A-Train" Boynton. Keyboardist Livingston was no longer an official band member, but was hired to play keys during the album sessions (as was Foster).  Regardless, during the sessions, Foster received a phone call from Quincy Jones asking him to produce and contribute a Canadian all-star recording to the USA for Africa famine relief project. Using a song title supplied by Rock and Hyde, Foster helped assemble an all-star band called Northern Lights to record the No. 1 Canadian hit "Tears Are Not Enough". Rock and Hyde received co-writer credits on the song (along with Bryan Adams, Foster, Rachel Paiement and Jim Vallance). As well, Hyde is heard as one of 44 vocalists on the song, and Rock was one of the engineers.

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RushRush is a Canadian rock band formed in August 1968 in the Willowdale neighbourhood of Toronto, Ontario. The band is composed of bassist, keyboardist, and lead vocalist Geddy Lee; guitarist and backing vocalist Alex Lifeson; and drummer, percussionist, and lyricist Neil Peart. The band and its membership went through several reconfigurations between 1968 and 1974, achieving its current lineup when Peart replaced original drummer John Rutsey in July 1974, two weeks before the group's first United States tour.

Rush is known for its musicianship, complex compositions, and eclectic lyrical motifs drawing heavily on science fiction, fantasy, history, and philosophy. The band's musical style has changed several times over the years, from a blues-inspired hard rock beginning, later moving into progressive rock, and including a period marked by heavy use of synthesizers.


robbie-robertsonJaime Royal "Robbie" Robertson, born Jaime Robert Klegerman; July 5, 1943, is a Canadian singer-songwriter and guitarist best known for his work as lead guitarist and primary songwriter within The Band. As a songwriter, Robertson is credited for such songs as "The Weight", "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down", "Up On Cripple Creek", "Broken Arrow" and "Somewhere Down the Crazy River". He has been inducted into the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame, and was ranked 59th in Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time.

By 1958, Robertson was performing in various groups around Toronto, including Little Caesar and the Consuls, Robbie and the Robots, and Thumper and the Trambones. By 1959 he had met singer Ronnie Hawkins, who led a band called The Hawks. In 1960 Hawkins recorded two early Robertson songs, "Hey Boba Lu" and "Someone Like You" on his Mr. Dynamo LP. Robertson then took over lead guitar with The Hawks and toured often, before splitting from Hawkins in 1963. Robertson's skill on his instrument continued to increase, leading Howard Sounes to write, "By twenty-two, he was a guitar virtuoso."

After Robertson left Hawkins, along with Levon Helm, Richard Manuel, Rick Danko, and Garth Hudson, the quintet named themselves Levon and the Hawks,[12] but, after rejecting such tongue-in-cheek names as The Honkies and The Crackers, as well as the Canadian Squires—a name the record label called them and that they immediately hated—they ultimately called themselves The Band.

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Buffy Sainte-MarieBuffy Sainte-Marie, OC (formerly Beverly Sainte-Marie; born February 20, 1941) is a Native Canadian singer-songwriter, musician, composer, visual artist, educator, pacifist, and social activist. Throughout her career in all of these areas, her work has focused on issues of Indigenous peoples of the Americas.  Her singing and writing repertoire also includes subjects of love, war, religion, and mysticism.

In 1997 she founded the Cradleboard Teaching Project, an educational curriculum devoted to better understanding
Native Americans. She has won recognition and many awards and honours for both her music and her work in education and social activism.

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Ian ThomasIan Campbell Thomas (born 23 July 1950) is a Canadian singer, songwriter, actor and author. He is the younger brother of comedian and actor Dave Thomas. He was born in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Thomas is a successful rock and roll musician in Canada, at the height of his solo career during the 1970s, with his most memorable hit being 1973's "Painted Ladies". Success in the American market, however, has proven to be elusive with the possible exception of "Painted Ladies", which remains his only U.S. Top 40 hit, and the song "Runner" which was recorded by Manfred Mann's Earth Band. He has also done musical composition for about a dozen films and television shows. Before breaking through with "Painted Ladies", he was a producer at the CBC. Before that, he was part of the folk music group Tranquility Base. In 1974 he won a Juno Award for "Most Promising Male Vocalist of the Year".

 

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Gino VannelliGino Vannelli, born June 16, 1952, is a Canadian singer, songwriter, musician and composer.

As a child, Gino's greatest passion was music, and he began playing percussion at an early age. By the age of 15, Vannelli began writing songs. Just out of high school, he signed his first recording contract with RCA under the pseudonym Vann Elli, but went on to study music at McGill University.

In 1974, "People Gotta Move" made it to No. 22 on the Billboard Top 100 (#21 in Canada). On February 15, 1975, Vannelli became the second Caucasian performer to appear on Soul Train (Dennis Coffey appeared on January 8, 1972). This was his television debut. With his records climbing the charts, Vannelli toured as the opening act for Stevie Wonder. In 1978, the song "I Just Wanna Stop" earned Vannelli an American Grammy Award nomination and was a number No. 1 single in Canada (#4 in United States). Vannelli's album Brother to Brother was certified platinum[clarification needed] in early 1979. Vannelli won Canada's Juno Award for Best Male Artist. Vannelli also won Juno Awards in 1976 and 1979. Vannelli's additional recordings of the 1970s include: "Crazy Life," "Powerful People," "Storm at Sunup," "The Gist of the Gemini" & "A Pauper in Paradise".  In April 1981, "Living Inside Myself" was on Billboard's Top 100 at number 6.

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Neil YoungNeil Percival Young, born November 12, 1945 is a Canadian singer-songwriter and musician. He began performing in a group covering Shadows instrumentals in Canada in 1960, before moving to California in 1966, where he co-founded the band Buffalo Springfield together with Stephen Stills and Richie Furay, and later joined Crosby, Stills & Nash in 1969. He released his first album in 1968 and has since forged a successful and acclaimed solo career, spanning over 45 years and 35 studio albums, with a continuous and uncompromizing exploration of musical styles. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame website describes Young as "one of rock and roll's greatest songwriters and performers". He was inducted into the Hall of Fame twice, first as a solo artist in 1995, and second as a member of Buffalo Springfield in 1997.

During the mid-fifties, at around the age of ten or eleven, Young was drawn to a variety of musical genres including rock and roll, rockabilly, doo-wop, R&B, country, and western pop. He would listen to pop music broadcast on the CHUM radio station via his transistor radio.

Young first began to play music himself on a plastic ukulele, before, as he would later relate, going on to "a better ukulele to a banjo ukulele to a baritone ukulele – everything but a guitar."

Young and his mother settled into the working class area of Fort Rouge, Winnipeg, where he enrolled at Earl Grey Junior High School. It was there that he formed his first band, The Jades, and met Ken Koblun, later to join him in The Squires. While attending Kelvin High School in Winnipeg, he played in several instrumental rock bands. Young's first stable band was called The Squires, with Ken Koblun, Jeff Wuckert and Bill Edmondson on drums, who had a local hit called "The Sultan". Young dropped out of high school and also played in Fort William (now part of the city of Thunder Bay, Ontario), where they recorded a series of demos produced by a local producer named Ray Dee, whom Young called "the original Briggs". While there, Young first encountered Stephen Stills. In the 2006 film Heart of Gold, Young relates how he used to spend time as a teenager at Falcon Lake, Manitoba, where he would endlessly plug coins into the jukebox to hear Ian Tyson's "Four Strong Winds". The Squires played in as many dance halls and clubs in Winnipeg and Ontario as they could.

After leaving the Squires, Young worked folk clubs in Winnipeg, where he first met Joni Mitchell. Mitchell recalls Young as having been highly influenced by Bob Dylan at the time. Here he wrote some of his earliest and most enduring folk songs such as "Sugar Mountain", about lost youth. Mitchell wrote "The Circle Game" in response. The Winnipeg band The Guess Who (with Randy Bachman as lead guitarist) had a Canadian Top 40 hit with Young's "Flying on the Ground is Wrong", which was Young's first major success as a songwriter.

In 1965 Young toured Canada as a solo artist. In 1966, while in Toronto, he joined the Rick James-fronted Mynah Birds. The band managed to secure a record deal with the Motown label, but as their first album was being recorded, James was arrested for being AWOL from the Reserve. After the Mynah Birds disbanded, Young and the bass player Bruce Palmer relocated to Los Angeles.

Once they reached Los Angeles, Young and Palmer met up with Stephen Stills, Richie Furay, and Dewey Martin to form Buffalo Springfield. A mixture of folk, country, psychedelia, and rock, lent a hard edge by the twin lead guitars of Stills and Young, made Buffalo Springfield a critical success, and their first record Buffalo Springfield (1966) sold well after Stills' topical song "For What It's Worth" became a hit, aided by Young's melodic harmonics played on electric guitar. According to Rolling Stone, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and other sources, Buffalo Springfield helped create the genres of folk rock and country rock.

After the break-up of Buffalo Springfield, Young signed a solo deal with Reprise Records, home of his colleague and friend Joni Mitchell, with whom he shared a manager, Elliot Roberts, who manages Young to this day. Young and Roberts immediately began work on Young's first solo record, Neil Young (November 12, 1968), which received mixed reviews.

For his next album, Young recruited three musicians from a band called The Rockets: Danny Whitten on guitar, Billy Talbot on bass guitar, and Ralph Molina on drums. These three took the name Crazy Horse (after the historical figure of the same name), and Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere (May 1969), is credited to "Neil Young with Crazy Horse". Recorded in just two weeks, the album opens with one of Young's most familiar songs, "Cinnamon Girl", and is dominated by two more, "Cowgirl in the Sand" and "Down by the River", that feature improvizations with Young's distinctive electric guitar solos billowing out over the hypnotic Crazy Horse backing.

Shortly after the release of Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere, Young reunited with Stephen Stills by joining Crosby, Stills & Nash, who had already released one album Crosby, Stills & Nash as a trio in May 1969. Young was originally offered a position as a sideman, but agreed to join only if he received full membership, and the group – winners of the 1969 "Best New Artist" Grammy Award – was renamed Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young.

In the autumn of 1970, Young began a solo acoustic tour of North America, during which he played a variety of his Buffalo Springfield and CSNY songs on guitar and piano, along with material from his solo albums and a number of new songs. Near the end of his tour, Young performed one of the new acoustic songs on the Johnny Cash TV show. "The Needle and the Damage Done", a somber lament on the pain caused by heroin addiction, had been inspired in part by Crazy Horse member Danny Whitten, who eventually died while battling his drug problems. Against the advice of his producer David Briggs, he scrapped plans for the imminent release of the live acoustic recording in favour of a studio album consisting of the Nashville sessions, electric-guitar oriented sessions recorded later in his barn, and two recordings made with the London Symphony Orchestra. The result was Young's fourth album, Harvest (February 14, 1972), which would prove to be a massive hit.

Young's more settled personal life was reflected in the rest of the Harvest album's mellow, pastoral tone. After his success with CSNY, Young had been able to purchase a ranch in rural Northern California (where he has lived since), writing the song "Old Man" in honour of the land's longtime caretaker, Louis Avila. The song "A Man Needs a Maid" was inspired by his relationship with actress Carrie Snodgress. "Heart of Gold" was released as the first single from Harvest, the only No. 1 hit in his long career. "Old Man" was also immensely popular.

In the second half of 1973, Young formed The Santa Monica Flyers, with Crazy Horse's rhythm section augmented by Nils Lofgren on guitar and piano and Harvest/Time Fades Away veteran Ben Keith on pedal steel guitar. Deeply affected by the drug-induced deaths of Whitten and roadie Bruce Berry, Young recorded an album specifically inspired by the incidents, Tonight's the Night (June 20, 1975).

Young reunited with Crosby, Stills, and Nash after a four-year hiatus in the summer of 1974 for a concert tour which was recorded and released in 2014 as CSNY 1974. It was one of the first ever stadium tours, and the largest tour in which Young has participated to date.

In 1975, Young reformed Crazy Horse with Frank Sampedro on guitar as his backup band for his eighth album, Zuma (November 10, 1975).

The first year without a Neil Young album since the start of Young's musical career with Buffalo Springfield in 1966 was in 1984. Young's lack of productivity was largely due to the ongoing legal battle with Geffen Records, although he was also frustrated that the label had rejected his 1982 country album Old Ways.

Young's 1989 single "Rockin' in the Free World", which hit No. 2 on the US mainstream-rock charts, and accompanying album, Freedom, rocketed him back into the popular consciousness after a decade of sometimes-difficult genre experiments.

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